The Feminism of Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled

When Clint Eastwood starred in the 1971 Don Siegel drama The Beguiled, it was in the hopes of pushing his image beyond the spaghetti Western antihero or misplaced musical star (yes, we remember Paint Your Wagon). The Beguiled gave Eastwood the opportunity to play a romantic lead, and much of the 90-minute runtime has Eastwood

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The Politics of The Mummy in 1932, 1999, and 2017

Fictional monsters have often been used to examine the “other” within ourselves. But the various incarnations of The Mummy — in 1932, 1999, and now 2017 — have touched on America’s interactions with foreign, exotic “others.” In a nutshell, each version follows the same narrative: stupid English-speaking people unearth an ancient mummy that brings bad

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Ripley’s Shame: The Backsliding Feminism of the New Alien Movies

In 1979 director Ridley Scott and screenwriter Dan O’Bannon gave audiences the scare of a lifetime with Alien and a feminist action heroine with Sigourney Weaver’s Ellen Ripley. The blue-collar woman with ‘80s curls transformed into a kick-ass action heroine, a small step for women in a landscape that’s still male-dominated. Weaver’s character hasn’t arrived

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How Free Fire Updates 1970s Feminism for 2017

Maybe it’s the fashion or the facial hair, but Hollywood’s got it bad for the ‘70s right now. From the world of television (Showtime’s upcoming comedy series I’m Dying Up Here or HBO’s The Deuce) to film (Sofia Coppola’s remake of 1971’s The Beguiled), there’s a marked uptick in returning to the world of the

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Where Are the Spring Break Movies for Women?

Over the next several weeks countless college-age teens will descend upon exotic locales to enjoy spring break, that idyllic period of drunken debauchery that MTV wants us to think is fun but is really a rum-soaked panic attack with less dancing and more groping. This free-spirited mentality is something Hollywood’s latched onto with countless movies

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‘Get Out’ and the Overlap of Disability and Racism

Jordan Peele’s horror-comedy Get Out is breaking new ground for its blunt, satirical take on the current state of race relations. But what many fail to notice amid the stark social commentary is Peele’s parallel presentation of disability alongside institutional racism. Disabled characters and people of color walk a similar path in Hollywood, both often

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How ‘Logan’ Fits in Trump’s America

Comics, like movies, are texts ripe for deconstruction. Animators and writers deliberately plot their stories for audience entertainment, while simultaneously commenting on the world around us. The power of the comic book is so strong that in 1954 a United States Senate Subcommittee convened to inquire as to whether (among other things) Batman and Robin’s

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